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Hello all!

My mother and I traveled to Maine last week for a few days.  We enjoyed our time there especially early Fall season and received wonderful hospitality among friends and people of Maine.  The reason we went to the Pine Tree State is that I am chosen to receive an award as well as Roger by the Maine Commission for the Deaf, hard of Hearing, and Late Deafened.  Roger was not able to make it to Annual Tea Awards held at Maine State House in Augusta, Maine because he currently works and lives in Seattle and has an upcoming trip to Europe which starts this week for six weeks.

On the behalf of the Commission for the Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Late Deafened (CDHHLD), I am recipient of an award, “Meritorious Support Services Provider Award” – This award is given to a trained support service provider. This year’s award is in recognition of exceptional support of Roger Poulin in his quest to complete the Appalachian Trail (AT).  Roger received an award, “Special Commendation Award” – This award is given to an individual or agency whose activities in and with the Deaf community deserves recognition.

We want to say our heartfelt thanks to the Maine Deaf, Hard of Hearing, Late Deafened, DeafBlind, Interpreter, and Hearing community and CDHHLD for their generous and amazing support for Roger’s quest with AT and my work.  People said that I am now “Honorary Mainer” since I am now embraced by the people of Maine.  🙂  

Annual Tea Awards - Meritorious SSP and Special Commendation

Annual Tea Awards


Image description: Two plaque awards are displayed with a picture of the State of Maine Seal on top part of award.

On left, Roni’s award – “Presented to Roni Lepore – Meritorious Support Service Provider – In Recognition of Exceptional Support of Roger Poulin in His Quest to Complete the Appalachian Trail – September 18, 2014 – The Deaf Community of Maine”.

On right, Roger’s award – “Presented to Roger Poulin – Special Commendation Award – September 18, 2014 – The Deaf Community of Maine”.

 

Here is a copy of my acceptance speech upon receiving my award – “Meritorious Support Service Provider” (be mindful that my speech at Annual Tea was not exactly same – upon giving my speech, I was flooded with generosity and gratitude from the audience that my speech altered in some ways for some wonderful reasons!) –

Hello, my name is Roni Lepore and my name sign is . I hail from New Jersey and my mother is here in the audience. I travel to Maine from time to time, not only for hiking on the Appalachian Trail, but also to work, teach, and enjoy the beautiful scenes here in the Pine Tree State. Each time I come here, I am always welcomed by the warm and friendly people of this state. That’s why I keep coming back as much as I can!

When I first found out that I am nominated to receive this award, I was not sure if it was a mistake since it goes to Mainers as I do not live here. Once I learned that it was an exception due to my role as a SSP to Roger Poulin, AT DeafBlind hiker, it is truly an honor to be recognized for my commitment and work. My journey of becoming SSP is probably unique as I received various training, not only here in USA, but around the globe – Australia, Europe, Asia, and Africa. I have worked with amazing and diversified DeafBlind clients from many walks of life – age, gender, race, ethnics, experience, and forth on. Each one of their requests to work with me was never the same. I relish and thrive on some challenges that come with SSP work. Yes, some days, there are difficult or bad moments. It requires one’s courage, faith, and belief to get through and move on. The communication and teamwork between SSPs and DeafBlind clients demand that each person understands the needs of each other’s as it becomes a critical two-way journey of enjoyment and respect.

So, being SSP for Roger Poulin was a completely “different zoo” for me. Roger got to witness my good and ugly sides and still worked together! I vividly recalled that when we first hiked for 3 months in our first year of hiking on the Appalachian Trail in 2010, it was a rough and bumpy road between us. It was 24/7 experience for both of us and we were trying to figure out how to work together and balance our control and power over each other. I wore many hats – hiker, first-aid provider, counselor, water girl, and so forth on, and best of all, a friend. It was probably an unorthodox practice of professional SSP as I may have broken most of rules, but it was Appalachian Trail – that’s where one discovers “true self” after going through phrases of man vs. wild, man vs. man, and man vs. self. That’s the true beauty of realizing one’s potentials through this kind of experience. Once Roger and I conquered Mt. Katahdin with David Whitney and his son, Ateon, we didn’t do it by ourselves. It was our friends, family, community – both hikers, Deaf, and DeafBlind – and even strangers backing us up. The most important of all about being a good SSP is to take a good care of yourself – mentally, physically, and emotionally – and ability to prepare and anticipate as much as one can.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank to the Maine Deaf, Hard of Hearing, Late Deafened, and DeafBlind community for recognizing my tireless work and my friends and especially my family for supporting my work. Lastly, Roger is a special person who taught a great deal about how to collaborate with a DeafBlind client even through difficult periods. Patience and respect are valuable legacies that come through Roger and me. Thank you, Roger, for allowing me to be me and being part of your dream to hike on the AT.

Here is Roger Poulin’s acceptance speech for his award, “Special Commendation Award” shown at Annual Tea – in ASL only. English Subtitles and/or text shall be available at later date. Roger gave me his blessings to publish his video here.

Roger’s quote from his interview with The Bangor Daily News was displayed at the Annual Tea –

Roger Poulin's quote

Image description: “My goal is to show that dreams can become a reality for anyone, regardless of their personal challenges and struggles. I also want to expose the world to understand why SSP (Support Service Person) is extremely important to DeafBlind community.” — Roger “Ad-Cane” Poulin

 

Here is the list of who’s who on CDHHLD who nominated me and Roger to receive the awards – special thanks go out to them!

Commission for the Deaf, Hard of Hearing and Late Deafened Members

Last Updated; August 29, 2014

Patty Sarchi, Deaf Consumer
Sitara Sheikh, Vice-Chair, Deaf Consumer Christy Callahan, Deaf Consumer
Karen Keim, Hard-of-Hearing Consumer Conrad Strack, Chair, Deaf Consumer
Kate Strack, Deaf Consumer Vacant, Deaf Consumer
Mary Hamlin, Hard-of-Hearing Consumer Vacant, Deaf Consumer
Vacant, Family Member of Deaf/HoH/Late-Deaf Individual w/Intellectual Disability or Mental Illness Vacant, Parent of Deaf or HoH Student
Vacant, Parent of Deaf or HoH Student Cathy Glover, Educator of the Deaf
David Sherry, Superintendent or his/her Designee of the Maine Educational Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing/Governor Baxter School for the Deaf Nicole Duncan, Audiologist
Susan Nay, Dept. of Education Representative Vacant, Local Educational Administrator
Theresa Jack, Rep. State/Fed Meryl Troop, Civil Rights Director
Emily Cain, Legislator Elyzabeth Smith, RID Interpreter
Vacant, Legal Rep. Vacant, Member-at-Large, Medical or Health Care Professional
Stephan Bunker, Member-at-Large Vacant, Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing Student
Marty Golden, Member-at-Large Romy Spitz, Late-Deafened Consumer

Hello folks!

Once again, there is an article mentioning Ad-Cane’s accomplishment via Appalachian Trail website – “If These People Can Hike the Appalachian Trail, So Can You”   It can be anywhere from a few months to years to complete the Appalachian Trail only if one is perseverance in pursuing it.  I am going to leave you with Ad-Cane’s quote:

“My goal is to show that dreams can become a reality for anyone, regardless of their personal challenges and struggles. I also want to expose the world to understand why Support Service Person (SSP) is extremely important to deaf and blind community.”  — Roger “Ad-Cane” Poulin

Enjoy rest of the summer, folks in the Northern Hemisphere!

The spring is around the corner, folks in the Southern Hemisphere!  )

 

Hello folks!  Just some quick announcements –

*We didn’t get to hike this Fall 2012 due to change in schedule – I had to do my jury duty in beginning of October.  *sigh*

*Cane fully recovered from his ribs injury.

*Cane and I gave a presentation on our AT DB Dream journey to a group of adult campers at Seabeck Deafblind Retreat near Seattle, Washington USA this past August.  It hit off and people loved our presentation.  Cane was kind to bring his backpack and some equipment for Deafblind campers to get an idea what they were.

*Cane and I are asked to teach a SSP (Support Service Provider for Deafblind people) course at University of Southern Maine starting this January for a couple of months.  We are excited about this opportunity!

*Cane got a position with Seattle Lighthouse working as a Technology Instructor starting this Spring.  Have no fear…..They support him to take some time off to complete his AT dream.

*We plan to resume our hiking this early June 2013 to complete our remaining 256 miles from NH to ME….to summit Mt. Katahdin to complete our AT DB Dream journey.

That’s all for now, folks.  Have a safe holidays.

I asked RamSham to translate my ASL into English since I am comfortable expressing myself in ASL.

First of all, I want to say thank you all of my friends, loved ones, and family for their continuing support and encouragement.  I really appreciate your thoughts about us and keeping a tab on our journey.  I want to tell you all I noticed myself that my vision changed from last year.  It prompts me to think about how it affects on my life outside of my journey on the AT and how it impacts me as a hiker on the AT.   It makes me think about yesterday’s episode – how it poses a challenge with my Deaf SSP.  I need to figure out with RamSham how to minimize that incidents going forward.  For past few months, I have thought about whether if I should continue with AT journey or cease to preserve my remaining vision.   My big question is about a regret.  Will I regret if I decide to give up my AT dream?  Will I regret if I decide to continue with my AT dream?  To be honest, I do not know.    We will continue for next few days to see how things are going.  Thank you for your everlasting support and we need it whether if you know it or not.  I want to especially thank to my Deaf SSP.

September 2020
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Appalachian Trail

Map of entire Appalachian Trail - 2,179 miles/3,507 km - through 14 states - Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine

Map of entire Appalachian Trail - 2,179 miles/3,507 km

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